Poll: Domino’s Delivers Gluten-Free Pizza–Will You Be Ordering?
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May 7 2012

Poll: Domino’s Delivers Gluten-Free Pizza–Will You Be Ordering?

Big news from Domino’s Pizza today – they are announcing plans for gluten-free pizza!  Many people who follow the gluten-free diet have been waiting for this day – a day they can pick up the phone and order gluten-free pizza just like they used to do before starting the gluten-free diet.

According to this article from USA Today, the crust will be certified gluten-free, but, and there always seems to be that ‘but’, “the pizza is still prepared in ovens with pizzas that aren’t gluten-free, so folks who are extra-sensitive need to be aware.”.  The pizzas will cost $3.00 more than the traditional pizzas from Domino’s.

The fact that the gluten-free pizzas will be cooked in the same oven as the regular pizzas is certainly cause for concern.  However, the risk for cross-contamination depends on the practices and training put in place by Domino’s and how it is executed by the employees at each location.  I would love to learn more about the procedure – will there be separate pans and dedicated places for baking in the oven?  If so, then using the same oven may not be a huge concern, as I cook both gluten-free and non-gluten-free items together in my oven. Another concern is the procedure for sauces and toppings.  Will there be dedicated sauces and toppings or will there be another California Pizza Kitchen debacle like we saw last summer?   I would love to pick up the phone and order a gluten-free pizza for convenience, but at what cost?

Please weigh in below in our poll and feel free to discuss further in the comments.

Updating with a video link I just learned about from Gluten Free Philly.  This is a video specifically about the gluten-free pizza at Domino’s.

Another update: FAQ straight from the Domino’s website.

Article Written by:

Kimberly Bouldin is a gluten-free wife, runner & blogger with two children in Columbus, Ohio. After her celiac diagnosis in 2006, she has made it her mission to embrace an entirely new approach to nutrition in a gluten-free world, exploring options that run the gamut from "made from scratch" homemade bread to sampling and reviewing the gluten-free prepared foods that are continuously being introduced to the market. While navigating the waters of becoming gluten-free, Kim shares her experiences and passes along valuable product reviews in addition to helping other moms of celiac kids develop healthy menus that are kid-friendly and palatable. Kimberly is a valuable resource for those who are newly diagnosed, as well as for the more seasoned gluten-free veterans. Follow Kim on Twitter!

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Comments

  1. Robin says:

    I found that video upsetting – a lot of double talk. Not to mention opens up plenty of confusion for my young son and all young children with Celiac (as it is deemed “gluten free” – but he can’t eat it, try explaining that at sports and birthday parties when friends try and help by ordering a gluten free pizza for them and they still can’t eat it) ARGH. I would rather the restaurants would stay out of the gluten free market if they can’t do it right.

    • Robin,

      I agree. While I appreciate the honesty, it is like they are jumping on the GF bandwagon without wanting to do the work it would take to make the pizza as safe as possible.

      Kim

  2. Kathleen says:

    I just saw the full press release on another GF site. Both the company and the national organization unequivocally state that the pizza is not safe for Celiac’s.

    While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, current store operations at Domino’s cannot guarantee that each handcrafted pizza will be completely free from gluten

  3. Kathleen says:

    The second paragraph of my reply (above) should have been in quotes! (It comes directly from the article)

  4. Kim, I spoke to reps from the NFCA today. It’s more than a shared kitchen concern. It’s a shared line, shared utensils, shared sauces, shared toppings, and a shared oven. The only thing that is truly gluten free is the crust initially. I was told that testing has been done on a number of finished pizzas and the “majority” of them tested under 20 ppm. I’d say the only thing different from this and the CPK debacle is that there’s a disclaimer, a YouTube video, and FAQs. I will not be eating this pizza even though I do not have a celiac diagnosis and it’s my personal opinion that anyone who is eating gluten free for medical reasons/fo their health (not just because the cool kids are doing it) should not be eating it either. As I just shared on Twitter, we need to remember our gluten-free rules. Is a gluten-free pizza crust made in a shared kitchen on shared lines with shared utensils/sauces/toppings in a shared oven gluten free? The rules say NO.

    Shirley

  5. KN says:

    I honestly think there is absolutely no point. They did it wrong in Australia and New Zealand some years back and I took them to task on it at http://hubpages.com/hub/glutenfreepizza-not

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