University of Chicago Offering Free Screening for Celiac Disease
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Nov 8 2013

University of Chicago Offering Free Screening for Celiac Disease

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center is an “international center of excellence” that provides patient care and education.  Every fall the center screens up to 500 people who are at risk for Celiac Disease.  The screening is done by a simple blood test that looks for Human Tissue Transglutiminase IgA and Total Serum IgA.  This test is important for those who aren’t able to get it done by their personal doctors for any number of reasons. 

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More about the screening:

The next screening is on November 16, 2013.

Pre-registration is now open. Click here.

You are eligible for this free blood screening if you are at risk for celiac disease and are eating a regular, gluten-containing diet. There is no need to fast before the test.

The antibody screening tests for celiac disease are not accurate if one is following a gluten-free diet.  If you have removed gluten from your diet, it will typically require that gluten is reintroduced on a daily basis, with at least one serving per day (1/2 slice of bread or a cracker), for at least 12 weeks prior to the antibody blood screening tests. This is sometimes referred to as a gluten challenge, which should only be conducted under a physician’s supervision.

Due to our focus on hosting the 15th International Celiac Disease Symposium, we will NOT have a Q&A panel or vendor fair at this years’ screening. Please register for ICDS2013 at:www.ICDS2013.org

The screening will be held on the 4th floor of the University of Chicago Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine, at 5758 S. Maryland Avenue.  Please remember you need to pre-register for this screening

Article Written by:

Kimberly Bouldin is a gluten-free wife, runner & blogger with two children in Columbus, Ohio. After her celiac diagnosis in 2006, she has made it her mission to embrace an entirely new approach to nutrition in a gluten-free world, exploring options that run the gamut from "made from scratch" homemade bread to sampling and reviewing the gluten-free prepared foods that are continuously being introduced to the market. While navigating the waters of becoming gluten-free, Kim shares her experiences and passes along valuable product reviews in addition to helping other moms of celiac kids develop healthy menus that are kid-friendly and palatable. Kimberly is a valuable resource for those who are newly diagnosed, as well as for the more seasoned gluten-free veterans. Follow Kim on Twitter!

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