Facts & Statistics About Celiac Disease
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Oct 26 2008

Facts & Statistics About Celiac Disease

Thanks to a heads up from Zach of Gluten Free Raleigh (via our Submit Celiac News link), it looks like he has taken the time to put together and post a great collection of Celiac statistics and/or facts about Celiac Disease.

As Zach mentions in his post, you can use this information to continue to promote Celiac awareness in your local area.

Celiac Disease Facts & Statistics

  • 1 out of every 133 Americans (about 3 million people) has CD.
  • 97% of Americans estimated to have CD are not diagnosed.
  • CD has over 300 known symptoms although some people experience none.
  • Age of diagnosis is key: If you are diagnosed between age 2-4, your chance of getting an additional autoimmune disorder is 10.5%. Over the age of 20, that rockets up to 34%.
  • 30% of the US population is estimated to have the genes necessary for CD.
  • 2.5 babies are born every minute in the USA with the genetic makeup to have CD.
  • There are 15 states in the US with populations less than the total number of Celiacs in the US.
  • CD affects more people in the US than Crohn’s Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease combined.
  • People with CD dine out 80% less than they used to before diagnosis and believe less than 10% of eating establishments have a ‘very good’ or ‘good’ understanding of GF diets.
  • It takes an average of 11 years for patients to be properly diagnosed with CD even though a simple blood test exists.
  • The US Department of Agriculture projects that the GF industries revenues will reach $1.7 Billion by 2010.
  • GF foods are, on average, 242% more expensive then their non-GF counterparts.
  • The Food Allergen Labeling & Consumer Protection Act became law in 2006 allowing for easier reading of food labels for those with CD. What took so long?
  • 12% of people in the US who have Down Syndrome also have CD.
  • 6% of people in the US who have Type 1 Diabetes also have CD.
  • Among people who have a first-degree relative diagnosed with Celiac, as many as 1 in 22 people may have the disease.
  • There are currently 0 drugs available to treat CD.

Article Written by:

Kyle Eslick is the founder of Gluten Free Media, as well as the creator of the popular Celiac Support Groups page. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and now Google+!

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Comments

  1. Carolee says:

    Thank you for the updated facts and statistics! Very helpful!

  2. Taeler says:

    im taeler im 17 and i have celiac disease, i’ve know for about a year, and am researching more about it so im more informed. this website helped me a lot. THANKS! :)

    • Dante says:

      Hi! i´m planing to sell candy of milk syrup for celiacs, and i want to know wath do you think about that idea! Do you think that your country need that?
      Thank you, plese keep in contac
      Dante, from Argentina

  3. Mahalie says:

    Thank you for the statistics! I want to use some of them in a paper I am writing. Could you tell me your sources?

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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